Duprasi

Description   |   Housing   |   Feeding  |   Fat-Tailed Duprasi  

Duprasi

The Duprasi, or Fat-tailed Gerbil, is a small insectivorous rodent from the northern Sahara desert. They are usually 3" to 4" inches in length and have a 2" thick tai which they store excess fat and water. Their tail is mostly bare with a few guard hairs. Duprasi are not closely related to the Mongolian Gerbils. They have very thick soft fur and a fluffy coat very simular to a Chinchilla. They are tan to grey with black ticking and a white underbelly. They are chunky in build with alot of fat on the body. This makes them appear larger than they are. Duprasis have a pointed snout with cat-like whiskers.

Duprasi are still quite rare in the pet trade. When purchasing your Duprasi, you want to ake sure it is alert, pleasant looking, in clean surroundings and have soft fluffy fur. An article, written by, Dennis Quinter, published in "Exotic Market Review" and "Animal Finder's Guide" back in the early 90', provides some added information.
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Housing

They are sociable animals and sometimes live in colonies. It's best to keep your Duprasi in an aquarium. We house our Duprasi with lots of bedding, about 3" to 4" inches, with 3" pvc pipe to burrow in and provide them with a nesting house. We only use Aspen or Walnut bedding. Wheels are a favorite of Duprasi.We use a Wodent Wheel to avoid injury. We also provide them with a dust bath about every other day. Other toys are also highly recommended because Duprasi can become bored and sleep their day away.
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Feeding

In the wild, the north Sahara Dessert, they are mostly insectivorous and live in gravely plains with patches of bushy vegetation. Keep fresh water at all times. We feed our Durprasi a mixture of rodent mix, mealworms, crickets and some fruits and vegetables but at limited amounts. A crock should be used for a food dish. Duprasis love to kick and jump in their food while they eat. The weight of the crock should help to keep some of the food in the dish. We also provide them with a cuddle bone for calcium and a mineral block that you can buy from any petstore or feedstore. They eat rodent blocks, raw peanuts, and Deluxe Hamster and Gerbil Mix but pick through it and eat certain seeds. They will also eat spinach, Romaine lettuce, and most any greens including most weeds. They love mealworms, crickets, moths and almost any other insect, even beetles.
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Fat-Tailed Duprasi

Fat-tailed Duprasi-Rodentia; Genus PACHYUROMYS (Fat-tailed Gerbil) is new to the U.S. market. The body length is 4"-5" with a tail length of 2". The tail is the unusual part of this animal. It is used to store fat and water. In most cases the bigger the tail the healthier the animal. They are Diurnal (active day and night) and normally very docile. The gestation period is 19-23 days with litter of size 3-6 young. The eyes are and they are on there own at 3-4 weeks. They will breed all year round. They are of chunky build with Chinchilla-like fur of some length. The tips of the fur is light colored and the base dark. They sometimes go into a state similar to hibernation, but not true hibernation, for periods of time. The mating ritual is rather unusual. They stand on their hind legs and wrestle, making squeaking noise. They never seem to actually bite each other but they get rather rowdy. If she is not receptive and he don't give up, she will turn and kick bedding at him. When the female is ready to have her litter, she will make a nest and get a little nippy. It is probably best to remove the male, but there is not a problem with the male, the female gets stressed out in small cages. They are good mothers. They are very docile and have never try to bite when being handled. There is no noticeable odor from their cage like you have with Hamsters and Gerbils. They spend a lot of time grooming their fur and washing their face. They like a sand bath and it is good for their fur. They alternate between napping and activity all day and night. They like a wheel to run in but sometimes they may fight over who gets to use it.
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