Sugar Gliders

Description   |   Housing   |   Health & Other Issues   |  Feeding   |   Recipe  

Description

Sugargliders have a small pointed nose with large eyes. They have velvet fur that is grayish tan in color. They have a black stripe down their
back and a white underbelly. Sugargliders are small marsupials fromAustralia. Adults weigh 4 to 6 oz and are approximately 12 inches from nose to tail. At least half of its length is tail! Sugargliders have a
membrane that stretches from their wrests to their ankles. This allows
them to glide from branch to branch. They use their tails like a rudder
as they travel in flight. They can glide up to 150 feet!

Sugargliders are becomming increasinly popular. Sugargliders live to 10 - 15 years if cared for properly. They tend to bond to a person, but bond better when they are younger. It would be cruel to sell your glider after a year or two. We suggest thinking it over very carefully if your ready to make a 10-15 year committment

Housing

Sugargliders need a large cage with tree branches inside as well as other toys such as hamster wheels, rope ladders, etc. We suggest a cage no smaller than 24" x 36". Anything smaller is cruel. Sugargliders also need a nest box or pouch to sleep in to protect them from the sun. Prolonged exposure to sunlight can kill a glider. We reccommend using Aspen shavings. Keep your glider away from drafts, heating or air conditioning vents to prevent them from catching a cold (60 to 90 degrees is a good temperature range).
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Health & Other Issues

Sugar gliders are prone to a condition known as hindleg-paralysis. This condition is usually caused by lack of a nutritionally balanced diet. The main culprit is a lack of selinium. However, selinium can be poisonous if overdosed. If you notice any loss of motion or sluggish motion in the back half of the body, be sure to contact a veterinarian that specializes in exotics or another sugar glider expert. Selinium is a common mineral found in many parrot foods and vitamins. You may by a parrot vitamin that contains the mineral, but be sure to give NO MORE that the very point of a steak knife mixed in their food or water.
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Sugargliders are nocturnal. Their large eyes dislike daylight or sunlight. Gliders are insectivores. They enjoy eating mealworms and crickets. You can provide them with cat food and cooked meat instead, but cat food was made for cats. Also a whole animal provides calcium and vitamins more effectvely than other foods. Mealworms, crickets, fruits and vegtables are an essential diet. Make sure your glider has fresh water everyday. DO NOT give your sugarglider chocolate! it can be harmful to your glider. Also so see health & other issues regarding diet. Sugar gliders also enjoy eucalyptus branches, sugar cane, and pure fruit nectar. Make sure plenty of food and fresh water are available at all times.
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Bourbon's Modified Leadbeaters (BML) Diet Recipe

1/2 cup Honey (do not us honeycomb, raw or unfiltered honey)
1 Egg WITH Shell (boiled or scrambled)
1/4 cup Apple juice (Regular kind - not frozen or baby juice)
1 4oz bottle Gerber Mixed fruit juice w/ yogurt (premixed)
1 Tsp Rep-Cal HERPTIVITE vitamine suppliment (Blue label/white container - DO NOT Substitute) 2 TSP Rep-Cal Calcium Suppliment non-phosphorous w/Vit D3 (pink label/white container - Don't substitute)
2 2 1/2 oz jars of stage 1 or 2 Heinz,Gerber or Beechnut Chicken baby food
1/4 cup wheat germ
1/2 cup dry baby cereal (Heinz or Gerber, Mixed or Oatmeal)

Blend well, pour into ice cube trays and freeze.. 1 cube in ice cube tray is approx 2 tablespoons.

Start out feeding (Per glider):
1 Tablespoon Fruit
1 Tablespoon Vegetable
1 Tablespoon BML
3 Tablespoons of insects
(crickets, mealworms, june bugs, moths)


(DO NOT feed Roaches, lightening bugs, or any bug caught outside or in an area where it could have insecticide on it)

If all food is eaten the next morning, add a little more each night until just a little food is left in the mornings.
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